inventory posts displayed by tag

Planning, Archiving & Safeguarding.

As we are experiencing a global pandemic—its a good time to take stock and update records. When it comes to archiving, photographs of your work are almost as important as the work itself. 
Estate planning is a daunting task that is often ignored or put off by working artists……

Here is some prudent advice ……

“Preserving an artist’s legacy has to do with authenticity. It’s all about capturing and documenting the maker’s perspective; that’s where it all begins…..

Today, artists have an opportunity to record their process and what they are thinking as they create their work. This approach leaves neither question nor prompts speculation on artistic ideation, concept and result….

Vision, technique, process—they are all essential to understanding an artist’s lifetime and legacy.

Artists can benefit by creating an inventory and keeping a rudimentary level of insurance to replace their tools and other assets. A disaster, a fire, hurricane or tornado, for example, can be devastating. Rebuilding a studio and replacing its contents can pose insurmountable obstacles without essential protections.” – Curator, director, potter, and writer Mark Leach

Read full article –
https://www.artworkarchive.com/blog/legacy-planning-for-artists-demystified

I can speak from experience living in Florida its a very strange feeling to be evacuated from your property and studio during a hurricane and the reality is you have to be covered. I have an inventory of work, one would think you would cram your vehicle with important works or equipment, maybe the most valuable works, but you don’t have time. You could also end up driving in the direction of more trouble because those pesky storms can change direction and speed at an alarming pace.

A unique aspect of an artists will, is what will be done with my art when I am gone. Some artists ask that their work will be sold via auction to benefit a child/children or a local art museum or artist residency.


“Although it was such a simple process, the task was quite daunting, mostly because writing a will requires one to consider one’s own mortality in a very concrete way. The process was made easier by my lawyer reminding me that a will is a changeable document – I can always edit and alter the will if circumstances change. While I didn’t feel completely prepared to write a will, I am so grateful to have received the Get Ready Grant; had I not it is likely that in five or ten years I still would not have an estate plan or will. The grant gave me the motivation to safeguard my legacy and my son’s future.” – April Hale from in her small studio in Stevensville, Montana – making sustainable, handcrafted jewelry by combining blacksmithing, enameling, and fine silversmithing into a contemporary, nature-inspired aesthetic. 

I have just taken advantage of saving this 22 page guide …….

Crafting Your Legacy is designed to be used either as a supplement to other guides on estate and legacy planning, or to initiate the process. The 22 page workbook includes eight case studies, checklists, and resources to help studio artists think about and plan for the fate of their tools, equipment, materials, library, archives, and other art making assets as part of their creative legacy.

Research and publication of Crafting Your Legacy was made possible by grants from the Joan Mitchell Foundation and the Windgate Charitable Foundation.

Follow this link…….

https://cerfplus.org/new-crafting-legacy-resource-available/

The image below is a fascinating installation of the London studio of Francis Bacon, it shows the story and survival of the artists studio this is one aspect of his life and career.

However a simpler view of keeping documentation of your wishes insures your collection of fine art isn’t donated to nearest charity shop by an unappreciative friend or family member!! – Share your stories in the comments below…..!

The pieces, estimated to be worth around $15,000, were apparently intended to make viewers think of the environment. https://gawker.com/cleaning-lady-throws-away-expensive-modern-art-she-mist-1527595660

The London studio of Francis Bacon (1909-92), which was moved and installed exactly as it was to the Hugh Lane Gallery in Ireland after the gallery acquired it in 1998. Every item is cataloged in an accompanying online database.CreditCreditPhoto by Perry Ogden © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved/DACS, London/ARS, New York, 2019

So with a little time, a little knowledge, take care of your life’s works. Some will value it and others may discard it.

Please leave your notes, comments, stories on this subject in the comments – I’d be so interested to hear your views.

art, artist, Artwork, estate, Inventory, legacy, planning, will,

Claire J KendrickUncategorizedMay 17, 20200 comments
Read More